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Third Georgia measles case in 2024 confirmed

The Georgia Department of Public Health (DPH) has confirmed a case of measles in an unvaccinated individual traveling with an international group of students. The individual, who does not live in the United States, is isolated and receiving treatment at a local hospital. DPH is working with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to identify and contact anyone who may have been exposed to the individual and to prevent further spread of measles.

Measles is very contagious and spreads through the air when an infected person coughs or sneezes. The measles virus can stay in the air for up to 2 hours after an infected person is there so you can become infected by simply being in a room where an infected person once was.

Measles symptoms appear 7 to 14 days after contact with the virus and typically include high fever, cough, runny nose, and watery eyes. Then a rash of tiny, red spots breaks out that usually starts at the head and spreads to the rest of the body.

Measles can be prevented with the MMR (measles, mumps, rubella) vaccine. The vaccine is safe and effective. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends children receive their first dose of MMR vaccine between 12-15 months of age and a second dose between 4-6 years old. More than 95% of people who receive a single dose of MMR will develop immunity to all three viruses. A second dose boosts immunity, typically enhancing protection to 98%.

People with symptoms of measles should contact their healthcare provider immediately.DO NOT go to the doctor’s office, the hospital, or a public health clinic withoutFIRST calling to let them know about your symptoms. Healthcare providers who suspect measles in a patient should notify public health immediately.


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Big thanks to the flat earth antivaxxers. Hey if we’re really lucky, Polio next. G-D’s will. Too bad about putting children’s lives at risk. Thoughts and prayers.

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