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Word of the day: Fey

Fey

[fei]

Part of speech: adjective

Origin: Middle English, ninth century

Giving an impression of vague unworldliness.

Having supernatural powers of clairvoyance.

Examples of fey in a sentence

"The meadow looked fey in the fog and moonlight."

"Yul's fey abilities allowed him to see flashes of the future."

About Fey

Fey comes from the Middle English word "fǣge" ("fated to die soon"), but it has Germanic origins, specifically developing from the word "feige" ("cowardly").

Did you Know?

The word "fey" is sometimes used as another term for fairies — mythical and magical beings found in European folk mythology. While modern takes on fairies usually describe them as benevolent (if a bit mischievous), people of the Old World had all sorts of wards to keep fairies away — these protections included iron, church bells, four-leaf clovers, and the practice of wearing clothing inside out.

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