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Word of the day: Legerity

Legerity

[lə-JER-ih-tee]

Part of speech:

noun

Alert quickness of mind or body.

Origin:

Middle French, mid-16th century

Examples of legerity in a sentence

"The lambs pranced with a sense of legerity."

"After a quick nap, I was refreshed and full of legerity for the rest of the day."

About Legerity

Legerity developed from the French word "légèreté," which evolved from the adjective "léger," meaning "light." This French word can be traced back to the Latin word "levis," meaning "lightweight."

Did you Know?

Legerity comes from the French "légèreté," which can be used to describe a sense of agility and quickness, but another usage is "thoughtlessness." While these ideas may seem incongruous, imagine light thoughts, or flippant thoughts. If someone isn't thinking about the weight or impact their words might have, they could be accused of "légèreté," or thoughtlessness.

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