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Word of the day: Sachet

Sachet

[sa-SHAY]

Part of speech: noun

Origin: French, mid-19th century

A small perfumed bag used to scent clothes.

Examples of sachet in a sentence

"Sadie bought French lavender sachets to put in her dresser drawers."

"The women would meet monthly and bring different dried herbs to make sweet-smelling sachets."

About Sachet

This word comes directly from French, meaning “little bag.” It is a diminutive of the Latin “saccus,” meaning “sack, bag.”

Did you Know?

Sachets have had varied cultural uses in history. For instance, in ancient China, a sachet was worn on the body, intended to absorb sweat and repel insects and evil spirits. During the Qing dynasty, a scented sachet was considered a token of love. In medieval Europe, sachets called “plague-bags” were worn around the neck to provide protection against what we now know were parasites and germs. In modern times of better hygiene, sweet-smelling sachets are still used in linen closets and clothing drawers for freshness.

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