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Word of the day: Mirific

Mirific

[mih-RIH-fik]

Part of speech: adjective

Origin: Latin, late 15th century

(Literary) Working wonders; wonderful.

Examples of mirific in a sentence

"The painting's reputation was so mirific, it attracted a record number of visitors to the museum."

"Yolanda's first glance at the mountains gave her a feeling so mirific, it nearly took her breath away."

About Mirific

Mirific first developed from the Latin word "mirificus" ("wonderful"). Then it transitioned into its modern usage through the Middle French adaptation "mirifique," which means "causing wonder and admiration."

Did you Know?

It might sound cliché, but there are few things as mirific as watching a sunrise or sunset over the mountains; the feeling of astonishment at the sight can be overwhelming. Many natural marvels provide this type of thrill — "mirific" is an adjective that can be applied to anything that instills a sense of wonder or awe.

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