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Word of the day: Sensate

Sensate

[SEN-seyt]

Part of speech: adjective

Origin: Latin, 15th century

Perceiving or perceived by the senses.

Examples of sensate in a sentence

"The meditation teacher encouraged tapping into the sensate realm."

"Many animals have sharper sensate abilities than humans."

About Sensate

This word stems from the Late Latin “sensatus,” meaning “gifted with sense,” which itself originates from “sensus,” meaning “perception, feeling, undertaking, meaning.”

Did you Know?

Sensate is an adjective that can be used to describe anything that can be perceived by the five senses: sight, hearing, touch, taste, smell. You might be able to see someone's tears or hear their crying, for example; those are sensate indicators that they are sad. However, you also have emotional intelligence and may pick up on other signals outside of your sensate abilities to get a better understanding of their emotions.

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