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Word of the day: Icarian

Icarian

[i-KER-ee-ən]

Part of speech: adjective

Origin: Latin, late 15th century

Relating to or characteristic of Icarus, especially in being excessively ambitious.

Examples of icarian in a sentence

"Her career path was marked with Icarian optimism."

"We need to revise the plan from the original Icarian model."

About Icarian

The word "Icarian" developed in Latin, but the origins are in the Greek myth of Icarus. According to the legend, Icarus and his father fled imprisonment using giant wings made of feathers and wax, but Icarus' disobedience led to his wings melting and his doom. "Icarian" likely developed as a way to quickly and easily reference this myth.

Did you Know?

The story of Icarus and his tragic end of flying too close to the sun (causing his wax wings to melt) lives on in popular culture. Literary characters and conversational turns-of-phrase embody key elements of his overly ambitious traits, ensuring the Icarian legend soars on.

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