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Word of the day: Mezzanine

Mezzanine

[MEH-zə-neen]

Part of speech: noun

Origin: French, early 18th century

1.A low story between two others in a building, typically between the ground and first floors.

2.The lowest balcony of a theater, stadium, etc., or the front rows of the balcony.

Examples of mezzanine in a sentence

"The hotel’s mezzanine floor had a lot of ornate woodwork."

"The office mezzanine incorporated glass and steel into its design."

About Mezzanine

This word came from France by way of the Italian “mezzanino,” stemming from “mezzano,” meaning “middle.” It originated from the Latin “medianus,” meaning “median.”

Did you Know?

While "mezzanine" is primarily used to describe architecture, "mezzanine financing," in the financial realm, is capital that has both debt and equity features. Just like a mezzanine floor sits between the ground and first floors, this type of lending falls between more traditional types of financing.

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